24 Hour Emergency Locksmith Aldershot

24 Hour Service | No Call Out Fee | Rapid Response | Competitive Prices | Fully Insured

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How Much Does An Aldershot Locksmith Cost?

Apart from the obvious emergency locksmith service, our Aldershot Locksmiths offer various other services such as rekeying locks, high security lock installation, uPVC door lock maintenance etc.  As with other businesses depending on how difficult the service is and the circumstances surrounding it, it can be more expensive to have it done. Below are just some of the locksmith services that we offer to our customers throughout the Aldershot area and the rationale for the prices.

Changing Locks

Changing locks is the most common service that our locksmith get asked to quote for. They can change interior and exterior door locks, safe locks and they can sometimes even repair loose or damaged locks. What makes a lock change expensive is when they need to provide the new locks for the customer. Locks differ greatly in both quality and in price and if the customer wants a quality lock, then the price is added to the total bill that they will be charged. Extra charges will also be added if the locksmith has to repair broken locks, rekey other locks and/or reprogram the home or business alarm system.

Alarm and Surveillance System

Our locksmiths are all fully qualified to not only change locks but also install state-of-the-art security systems, CCTV and video surveillance systems for residential or commercial customers. Installation of the cables, complex pre-programming and compatibility issues may also affect the cost of this service. Aside from this, extra charges may also be incurred for additional services such as remote access and keyless access control and entry. But all of this will be itemised on your Free quote.

Emergency Lock Out Situations

If you have lost your key or being locked out of your premises for whatever reason, then no matter what time of day or night it is you want to gain entry again. We offer 24-hour 7 days a week emergency locksmith service, there is no call out charge if you are in the Aldershot area. The price for the emergency lock out will depend on the complexity of the problem and how long it is going to take our engineer to fix and whether he needs to supply any new locks or fittings.

 

Areas Of Hampshire We Cover

Some of the postcodes in Aldershot we have provided Locksmith services in:
GU11 1AD Greville Close, GU11 1AE Leith Drive, GU11 3ER Lansdowne Road, GU11 3ES Upper Elms Road, GU12 4GB Squirrel Court, GU12 4GD Coppice Square, GU11 1LP Elms Road, GU11 1LQ Frederick Street, GU11 3NF Weybourne Road, GU11 3NG Eggars Hill, GU12 4NZ Wyndham Street, GU12 4PA Beechnut Road, GU11 3EA Grosvenor Road, GU11 3ED Lysons Road, GU12 4FA Fox Court, GU12 4FE Woodland Walk, GU12 4DX Blackwater Way, GU12 4DZ Lower Farnham Road
Have you lost your keys and become locked out of your home or office?

Has your home been burgled?

We know that it can be one of the most stressful things that happen to you and especially if it occurs late at night or in the early hours of the morning, which is why we operate a 24 hour emergency locksmith service throughout the Reading area. Our service is professional, fast and reliable 24 hours a day 7 days a week for both residential and commercial customers.

All of our emergency locksmiths have had a CRB check and have a number of years experience and carry the tools and parts to allow them to complete most jobs on the spot. Some of the emergency locksmith services we provide for commercial and residential customers include:

  • Emergency Lockout Access
  • New Lock Installation
  • Lost or Broken Key Replacement
  • Lock Repair
  • UPVC Door And Window Lock Maintenance
  • Rekeying Of Locks
  • High Security Lock Installation

Do You Have Another Key In Case You Are Locked Out?

There is a popular misconception about locksmiths in Aldershot. Many people think that if they lose their keys then the local Locksmith can come to their location, look at the lock, make a mould somehow and then produce a new key. Unfortunately, this is just not the case. If you lose your keys and you don’t have a spare, then the only option that your local locksmith has is to replace the lock.

This is where the real cost comes in for locksmith services, you are not only paying them for their time and labour, you are also paying for the products that they use to replace your lock.

In most cases, locksmiths will carry around everything they need to service their customers. This means that their trucks or cars have replacement deadbolts, doorknobs and even key columns for your car. There may be some occasions that they do not have the necessary items to replace a lock, but overall they will have everything that they need.

This does not mean that you have to use them to replace the locks. You can have them remove the old lock and you can do the rest if you like. However, if you aren’t handy, this isn’t recommended.

Now, if you are in a situation where you have broken your key in your lock, then this might be a salvageable situation. Most Hampshire  Locksmiths can piece together a broken key and make a new key from the broken one. However, the condition of the key is important. If you break the key and there are several pieces and some are slivers, then even the best locksmiths may not be able to do anything with it.

Bent keys are also able to be copied by Mobile Locksmiths. However, in most cases, you can take a bent key into a locksmith shop rather than calling a locksmith to you. This depends, of course, on whether the bent key is for your car or van. It is important for you to not attempt to straighten the key yourself as you may end up breaking it or causing more damage so that it prevents a copy being made.


The Locksmith Trade - The Good, the Bad and the Ugly

residential locksmith services

In this article we are attempting to uncover the mystery of those fantastical, sometimes awe and question inspiring implements that those in the locksmith field utilize. As evidenced, there are quite a large amount of these requisite tools that a locksmith uses on a daily basis at the shop or out in the field which have brought to light not necessarily the method of the locksmith, as they are all different and individual, but the great number of implements the locksmith uses and is skillfully proficient with, if not an expert with, to maintain standards of operation in this type of industry.

There are many devices and equipment required for installing door locks and various other door hardware. A number of various saws will venture to this type of field work such as the compass saw (also known as the keyhole saw), a reciprocating saw, mixed sized hole saws which are used with spade bits to install locks on doors, wallboard (drywall) saws and for good measure I will include here a broom and dust pan, drop cloths and a vacuum cleaner.

An assortment of nails and screws (all different sizes, types, one way, etc.) in addition to a screw gun will be making the rounds with installing doors and door hardware along with a shovel, wood glue, a shim pick and utility knives and blades, strike plates and strike boxes all of various size.

Wood chisels of ranging size are needed when the doors a locksmith is installing locks and other hardware on are made of wood. More you ask? Of course there are more and we wouldn't have it any other way, since the locksmith definitely has more in their arsenal when working on these types of jobs! There is the lever, the cylinder removal tool, multiple filler plates, door reinforcers of various finishes and sizes, a pry bar and a shovel if the need arises.

Acting as a guide, the boring jig is a template for drilling precise cutouts for locks and door hardware and accurate installation holes.

Door locks and door hardware may appear to be simple fixes, something replaceable by almost anyone, but you might want to think again when considering the proper care and attention that must be given.

All to often the do it yourself types and novice handy men have come upon the tasks meant for a locksmith and their tools and felt this it truly is a job they can complete without error. While many of the items written about in this series may sound familiar and easy to use, and perhaps they are easy to use in theory, the job of the locksmith, their experience and time tested accuracy and dependability with the tools of the trade are best left in the hands of the very people who use them on a daily basis. The locksmith.


How Do Locksmiths Work?

reliable locksmith

Are you thinking about becoming a locksmith? Many people ask me about my profession when I arrive at a job site. The idea of working with the public, working with hand tools, making a quick buck on lock-out calls, and of course the power and ability to unlock doors, cars and safes is quite intoxicating for some people. I don't place help wanted ads, but nevertheless I average one unsolicited résumé a month via e-mail. Usually it arrives from an eager teenager looking to do an apprenticeship. O.J.T. (on-the-job training) is a fine way to go if you can get the gig. That's precisely how I started. That and reading every trade magazine I could get my hands on, endless hours doing research on the web, taking classes, attending trade expos, and talking with any locksmith who would take the time to chat with me (and many would, so long as I wasn't one of their competitors). But that's how it is for most lock jocks. Once you begin work as a locksmith it gets under your skin. It consumes you and becomes an obsession. That's not exactly a bad thing after all; to be (God willing) financially successful at what you enjoy is a great way to pay the bills. There is, however, a price to pay that does not fit with most people's lifestyle, and thus -- the purpose of this article.

The Good: Helping the public and making a few bucks while doing it. First off, I rarely charge to unlock a car or house when there is a child locked inside. When I get the call, usually from a panicked parent declaring his or her child is locked inside a car, I rush to the scene. There are few better moments for me as a locksmith than seeing the relief in a mother's eyes when I unlock the door and she pulls her child from a sweltering car on a warm summer day. "You're my HERO," she says as she holds her child close with tears in her eyes. "No charge ma'am. We don't charge for children locked in cars. If you like, for a small fee, I can make you a copy of your car's door key so it's less likely to happen again." They almost always say yes, and the payment for the key usually accompanies a tip. The "up sale" is simply to cover my gas going out on the call, and the tip, if any, buys me lunch.

The rest of my jobs are typically for-profit jobs. Still, over half of what I charge goes right back into the company in the form of gas, insurance, advertising, trade organization dues, license fees, vehicle maintenance, tools, supplies, and other expenses.

As a locksmith you will never get rich, but if you play your cards right you could retire well. The plan, as I read in a popular trade magazine, is to sell a well-established shop with a long list of customer accounts, while owning and collecting rent on the property the shop sits on. It's even better if you own an entire complex and collect rent from your shop's neighbors, too. I personally know a retired locksmith who did exactly this and I understand he is doing quite well for himself.

Many locksmiths make and sell tools and/or reference books, or teach classes (as I do) to supplement their income.

The Bad: Being on call 24/7. After-hours and weekend service can account for a large part, if not most when first starting out, of your income. Then there are the late night calls. 2am, half drunk and he can't find his car keys: "I'm sorry sir -- I can't help you drive your car tonight, but if you call me in the morning I will be happy to assist you."

The locksmith industry is a highly regulated (but necessarily so) security industry. The licenses, insurances, and bonds you have to carry can cost a small fortune. I have a city business license, a state locksmith license, a State Contractor's License for lock and security work, two insurance policies (general liability and commercial vehicle insurance), two different bonds, and I am a member of two major national trade organizations. In California, you need to be fingerprinted and pass State and Federal background tests. I am also a member of some local organizations including the Chico Chamber of Commerce and the North Valley Property Owner's Association.

The cost of running a business like this can be overwhelming and there is always another tool you need to buy, another software update, or replacement parts/tools that need to be ordered. I am currently saving up for a high security key machine that retails for $5,800.

Let's not forget the paperwork. You will need to keep legal forms for customers to fill out and detailed records of who, what, where and when. The last thing you want to do is make keys to a car or house for someone who does not have authority to hold a key to that property.

Lastly, buy a nice shirt and tie because there is a good chance you will find yourself in a court of law before long for, among other things, domestic disputes.

The Ugly: Evictions, repossessions (R.E.O.'s), and re-keys after a domestic dispute. There are few things as humbling in this profession as writing a bill for after-hours service and handing the new keys over to someone wearing a fresh black eye. I vividly remember one woman who was standing next to a hole in the drywall where her head was forcibly inserted only a few hours earlier. The local sheriffs know me because it's not uncommon to perform the re-key and security checks while they are still there, filling out their report.

Can you say fleas? Yep, now I keep flea powder in the van because you never know what condition a recently foreclosed house will be in.

Angry former tenants who have been kicked out can also present a challenge. Sometimes the locks are disabled or destroyed, and I keep latex gloves in the van in case I ever have to pick open another lock that has been urinated on.

The bottom line: I am quite happy being a locksmith, most of the time. The pay, the freedom of the job (I can leave my schedule open if my kids have a school event), and the satisfaction of helping people while making a profit for myself keeps me going.

My advice to you:

1. Do your research before entering the market as a locksmith. My town has too many locksmiths per capita. There is barely enough work to go around much of the time.

2. Get on with another locksmith and be willing to relocate, as you may be required to sign a "no compete" contract saying you will not leave to be your boss's competitor. Locksmith schools are okay, but a seasoned locksmith can show you some tricks of the trade that can help you make higher profits or perform jobs better and quicker than the basic skills taught in most schools.

3. Be willing to pay your dues. It will take many years to build up a customer base, and a name for yourself. A wise locksmith once told me it takes at least three years before they (the customers) know you're there, and seven before they notice you are gone.

4. When you start out on your own, get an easy to recognize logo and put it on everything: your van, invoices, pens to hand out, and every other piece of advertising (see our logo below).

5. C.Y.A. Document everything and have pre-printed, professionally prepared, legal forms for your customers to fill out.

6. Don't get too carried away. If you have other obligations, like a spouse and/or kids, make sure to make time for them. It's hard to turn the phone off, or turn down calls because you're turning away money, but you can't get back the days you miss.

A former employer of mine occasionally tells the story of how he made $2,000 in one weekend dispatching calls to his on-call locksmith, while he was on a boat on Lake Shasta with his wife. It was a rare weekend vacation for them and he spent a good part of the day on the phone. She died of cancer two short years later, and he later told me he would give just about anything to have that day back. I know this story personally as I was the on-call employee that weekend.

To quote Uncle Ben (from Spider-Man, the movie): "With great power comes great responsibility." The ability to unlock doors, bypass alarm systems, unlock safes, and the inside knowledge of customers' security systems has been the downfall of unscrupulous locksmiths. In short, if you can't handle the temptation, don't pursue the profession.

Finally: Never take advantage of someone. Like Grandpa always said, it can take a lifetime to build up a good reputation but only a moment to ruin it.

Good luck in whatever you decide -- unless, of course, you are planning to open a lock shop in my service area.